The Indie Web
4.4.2020 code

The most beautiful command line docs. Maybe ever?

When you’re getting into development, one of the trickier things is getting used to the command line. Learning git, and git commands are often one of the first steps in Bootcamps, and for anyone who is coming into coding from a design or creative background, suddenly working in the brutally simple terminal can come as a big surprise.

This wonderful website, dash dash, takes all of the manual pages of different command-line tools and pulls all of that documentation into a clean concise website.

What went into it?
3.31.2020 open-source

Real vim users use vim cubed!

Has anyone ever stopped you on the street to show you their vim setup? Well, now you have the perfect reply with vim cubed.

Vim Cubed will bring your code editing into the 3rd dimension, literally in the form of a spinning cube. As the cube spins infinitely, your editor works with all the gusto and power that vim can provide.

Any extra details?
3.29.2020 games

This unique 8x8 font has a great text based adventure to show it off!

Mass Driver is the flashy new font foundry that just moved into the neighborhood.

They’ve just launched with a very creative pixel font, titled MD-Eight, the eight namesake is because each character is set within an 8 by 8 grid of pixels.

The font makes great use of negative space, making it impressively legible for a font made out of pixels.

How do I get it?

Origami with JavaScript. An amazing study of color and folds.

If you’ve ever sat and tried to figure out the math behind geometric folds? It’s an incredibly tricky process! With this Origami Study Yuin Chien has created a beautiful digital representation of the folds, and colors of origami.

In her own words, the project is:

A series of visual study exploring origami compositions and colors, hoping to give forms to personal memories and poetic imagination.

More like this?
3.9.2020 art roundup

Wash those hands! Creatives types are showing up to teach you good hygiene.

In the grips of the current COVID–19 climate, we’re all understandably in the midst of looking at our current hygienic ways, and ideally improving it for the better of all of us!

Over the past few weeks I’ve spotted a lot of very helpful and creative projects popping up within the personal hygiene realm, and I’d love to highlight them!

Wash Your Lyrics by William Gibson is one of my favorite examples.

We’ve learned that washing your hands to the tune of Happy Birthday (some people say twice) is a great way to get the correct amount of time to have truly clean hands. Wash Your Lyrics allows you to provide a song, and with the tempo and lyrics to that song, it will give you the step by step guide to washing your hands with it!

Lets see em?
3.8.2020 art

Photos in photos in photos. This game is coming along great!

Game developer and student Matt Stark has come up with a simple idea that is expanding day by day into a really cool, conceptually mind-bending game.

At its core, the idea is that each picture you take with your camera contains a world within it. You can then place the photograph within your view… and step right into that world!

Are there more details?
3.5.2020 code

This is interactive poetry at its best.

Thibaud Goiffon is a French student studying graphic & interactive design. His project, Intimacy, shows off an amazing spark of creativity and an ability to make curiously fun web toys!

What have people been making?
3.2.2020 code art

Broider your borders with this nifty tool!

The aptly named Broider by Max Bittker is a nifty tool for creating, and decorating, your borders.

Broider allows you to paint your borders in a one-bit style (the bit is either on or off, no colors), with a few small tools to help keep things in line: a 9x9 grid, an undo button (for people like me who never get things right the first time), and a little lock button that will keep all of your painting symmetrical.

What have people been making?

The best of PlotterTwitter, February 2020.

February has come and gone, and since it’s a leap year, 29 days have gone with it. Twenty-nine wonderful days of my favorite Twitter hashtag, #PlotterTwitter.

As with January, here’s another round-up of amazing artists & pen plottings, alongside any other commentary/algorithm I can spot within the works!

Straversi printed off an elevation map of SF in brilliant detail, using this fantastic open source tool that was built on top of Mapbox.

Joseph Wilk is doing some amazing work, hooking the axidraw up to an airbrush. With liquid ink, the outcome is intricate and super random.

More Please!
2.29.2020 art generative-art

A generated space for your browser and walls.

The Generated Space is a gallery of procedural and generative art which encompasses a wide variety of techniques and methods. It was created by the wonderful developer and artist Kjetil Golid.

In Kjetil’s own words:

It presents a wide range of different generative algorithms; from organic flow fields and particle systems to rigid fractals and grammar-based shapes. Some more serious than others.

The variety of generative art is really astounding, with creations taking inspiration from a wide range of diverse origins and sources.

From artists such as Jackson Pollock:

Engineer and Mathemetician Oliver Byrne:

Exploring different generative algorithms and ideas, like Cellular Automata:

As well as amazing studies of isometric forms and shapes, creating wonderfully complex structures:

How do I buy them?